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Her curse only takes seven days to work its deadly magic, but it’s been over ten years since Samara was last seen on the big screen in the American version of the Ring franchise. That all changes with the release of Rings this weekend, and while it does share the same name as Jonathan Liebesman’s 2005 short film that bridges the gap between The Ring and The Ring Two, it doesn’t share its predecessor’s ability to get under your skin.

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She gave a generation nightmares with her creepy spider crawl (which she was specially brought in to perform) in the well scene of The Ring Two, and now Bonnie Morgan is back to bring Samara to life once again in Rings. With the seven-day curse coming back to the big screen this weekend from Paramount Pictures, Daily Dead recently had the opportunity to talk with Morgan about returning to the iconic role, her family's horror history, her hilarious Samara TV store prank, scaring the cast and crew when the power went out on set, and more.

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In the middle of the 20th century, Alfred Hitchcock made a career out of generating fear from the mundane. Psycho made us afraid to shower. The Birds had us looking toward the skies for more than just the pigeons looking to crap on our heads. And I’ll be damned if Rear Window didn’t get me to stop spying on my neighbors with a telescopic camera.

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From Alex in Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange to Father Murder in Rob Zombie's 31, Malcolm McDowell has played a wide range of intriguing roles over his illustrious career, including his recent scene-stealing performance as the Chairman in Roger Corman's Death Race 2050.

With the new Death Race movie now out on home media from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, Daily Dead had the great pleasure of speaking with the prolific actor to talk about collaborating with Corman, acting in A Clockwork Orange, working with Rob Zombie on 31 and his Halloween films, and if he would ever consider being a part of the new Halloween movie.

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While at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, I had the opportunity to check out a few films that were just a bit outside the horror realm, including Cary Murnion and Jonathan Milott’s sociopolitical actioner Bushwick, Marianna Palka’s bleak comedy Bitch, and David Lowery’s unforgettable A Ghost Story, and you can read my reviews for these on-the-fringe-of-horror titles right here in one place.

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The Twilight Zone series stands as the benchmark for weird, wonderful, and creepy TV viewing. Many shows and movies have tried to duplicate its moralistic mysteries with varying results. Night Slaves is a charmingly odd TV movie not only cut from the same cloth, but with ties to it as well.

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I have been a fan of Nacho Vigalondo’s ever since seeing Timecrimes back in 2008, and to be perfectly honest, while he’s been at the helm of several other impressive projects, nothing had tickled my cinematic fancies quite like his time travel horror/science fiction mash-up. That is, until I saw Colossal, which is easily Vigalondo’s most ambitious effort to date. A thoughtful and ingenious creature feature that raises the bar for modern monster movies, Colossal is now an early front-runner for one of my favorite films of the year.

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Harmony is an ideal. If everyone just got along, the world could be one big campfire sing-along, a Coke commercial writ large, right? But unfortunately that’s not human nature; certainly not as it pertains to our fellow earthly citizens, or to the globe itself. The ‘70s saw the rise of the eco horror film; “Mother Nature’s back, and she’s pissed” practically emblazoned across posters from the likes of Frogs (1972), Phase IV (1974), and Day of the Animals (1977). Australia threw their hat in the ring at the tail end of the cycle with Long Weekend (1979), a fascinating look at environmental and personal disharmony.

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Earlier this week, Irish filmmaker Chris Baugh celebrated the world premiere of his crime thriller Bad Day for the Cut at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival’s Midnight program. While in Park City, Daily Dead caught up with Baugh, as well as co-writer/producer Brendan Mullin and Bad Day star Nigel O’Neill, to hear more about their collaboration, the way they focused on the characters instead of just giving viewers mindless violence, and their thoughts on working with Susan Lynch (who portrays the film’s big bad, Frankie Pierce).

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I am a diehard horror fan, but every once in a while I have to scrub the carnage from my eyes with something that is over-the-top cute. For me, this is usually after watching anything involving cannibalism, most recently Jim Mickle's We Are What We Are. My favorite remedy is this bunny eating berries.

At first, I thought my impulse to squeeze the heck out of these cute puff balls was due to the residual aggression induced from watching a horror movie, but then I realized, as I’m sure many of you have, that the impulse to essentially destroy these visages of adorableness happens regardless of watching something scary.

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Over the last several months, writer/director Julia Ducournau’s Raw has been finding a lot of success on the festival circuit, and recently, her feature film debut played as part of the Spotlight program at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival.

While in Park City, Daily Dead was thrilled for the opportunity to sit down and speak with Ducournau in-depth about her approach to Raw (which rocked me when I saw it last year during Fantastic Fest). The filmmaker discussed how her cinematic story was her own way of exploring the trivialities of the human body, the often tumultuous nature of sibling rivalry, and more.

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Over the weekend, filmmakers Jonathan Milott and Cary Murnion, the team behind the horror comedy Cooties, celebrated the world premiere of their action thriller Bushwick at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. While in Park City, Daily Dead sat down with the duo to talk about the long road to getting Bushwick made, working with co-stars Dave Bautista and Brittany Snow, and more.

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As far as franchise finales go, Resident Evil: The Final Chapter is an ambitious, action-packed, and wholly satisfying conclusion for fans of the series that have been waiting to see what the Umbrella Corporation and the Red Queen’s endgame would be ever since the original Resident Evil film premiered in 2002.

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Horror anthologies can be a tough feat to pull off, especially when you’re trying to pull together different filmmakers’ visions into one cohesive experience. That being said, XX, which recently celebrated its world premiere at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, succeeds in delivering four wildly distinct stories from several female directors, featuring the talents of Jovanka Vuckovic, Karyn Kusama, Annie Clark (aka St. Vincent), and Roxanne Benjamin. Beyond just its historical significance, XX stands out as one of the more successful anthologies we’ve seen as of late, regardless of the gender of its directors.

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It’s hard to believe that after 15 years we’ll be coming to the end of the road with Alice (Milla Jovovich) and the Umbrella Corporation in Paul W.S. Anderson’s Resident Evil: The Final Chapter, which is being released by Screen Gems this weekend in theaters nationwide.

At the recent press day, Daily Dead caught up with several of The Final Chapter’s co-stars, including the returning Ali Larter (who reprises her role as Claire Redfield) and two franchise newbies, William Levy and Eoin Macken.

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