Mobile
Banner

Undoubtedly, one of the most beloved genre movies to come out of 1987 was Fred Dekker’s The Monster Squad, a perfect blend of humor, heart, and affection for the classic monsters so many of us grew up on.

Read More

Forced to live together in a confined space and depending on each other for survival, the Dollanganger siblings from 1987’s Flowers in the Attic have always reminded me of the kids from The Boxcar Children book series I grew up reading, although instead of solving mysteries on fun adventures, they were busy dealing with a scissors-wielding grandma, a murderous mother, and some intense incestual feelings—not exactly the type of material you’d find next to Gertrude Chandler Warner’s books in the library.

Read More

1987 may be the year of the last great Argento movie.

Read More

I was seven years old when Angel Heart was released. I had absolutely no business whatsoever seeing the film at that age, but my stepdad at the time was obsessed with all things film-related, so he would drag me to just about every single movie that hit our local theater, and it just happened to be that 1987 was the year I spent hanging out in theaters the most.

Read More

I’ve never been to any of my high school reunions. I went to school in the Caribbean, and getting back there is hard to do, what with life interfering with my ability to reunite with former compadres. In real life, that is; celluloid memories, however, are ever present. And with another school year ending, what better time to revisit that sequel in name only, Hello Mary Lou: Prom Night II (1987)—a film that copies all the class notes off of A Nightmare on Elm Street and Carrie, but does it with such charm and gusto that you can’t help but love it anyway. This Canadian graduate from the Class of ’87 still has the moves. (The film that is, not me. My moves are buried in a trunk in the basement.)

Read More

Her dreams are disturbed by a boogeyman with blades, but Taryn White’s waking hours are equally haunted by the ever-present urgings of drug addiction in A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the second sequel in the Elm Street franchise, and while the film’s eye-popping special effects are still a marvel to behold (I’ll never look at a pig head the same way), it’s the troubled teenagers at Westin Hills Psychiatric Hospital who still steal the show, especially Taryn, whose heartbreaking story arc is filled with sinister forces on both sides of her eyelids.

Read More

1987 was an exceedingly awesome year for kid-centric horror movies. In the span of just a few months, we were treated to both Tibor Takács’ The Gate and Fred Dekker’s The Monster Squad, and honestly, there may have not been a better year to be a young genre fan during that decade than in good ol’ 1987. And while there were an incredible amount of quality horror movies for this writer to dig into from that 12-month span of releases, one movie that I always had a deep appreciation for was The Gate, a story that I related to on numerous levels, even if I never happened to summon a horde of demons from digging a hole in my backyard.

Read More

Imagine the following sentence in the “'80s horror trailer guy” voice. In 1982, a killer haunted the halls of Crippen High School, giving it the moniker “Horror High.” Now, in 1987, a movie crew returns to Horror High and may or may not survive retelling the story of these heinous crimes. There will be blood! Lots and lots of blood!

Read More

[Editor's Note: A version of this retrospective originally appeared in the September 2014 issue of DEADLY Magazine.] With House II: The Second Story, the vastly underrated sequel written and directed by Ethan Wiley (who also wrote the screenplay for the original House), New World Pictures introduced audiences to a whole new world filled with unexpected frights and adventures with an Old West twist. The sequel was released in late August of 1987 and took a decidedly left turn away from the more straightforward house of horrors style seen in Steve Miner’s original film, instead favoring a tone that was much more light-hearted, fun-spirited, and far more family friendly.

Read More

[Editor's Note: A version of this retrospective originally appeared in the September 2014 issue of DEADLY Magazine.] With House II: The Second Story, the vastly underrated sequel written and directed by Ethan Wiley (who also wrote the screenplay for the original House), New World Pictures introduced audiences to a whole new world filled with unexpected frights and adventures with an Old West twist. The sequel was released in late August of 1987 and took a decidedly left turn away from the more straightforward house of horrors style seen in Steve Miner’s original film, instead favoring a tone that was much more light-hearted, fun-spirited, and far more family friendly.

Read More

How does one start a piece about their favorite horror movie of all time? I’ve been wracking my brain trying to come up with the words that will evoke the visions of hellish trumpets and demonic halos that dance in my head whenever I think about Clive Barker’s feature film directorial debut masterpiece, Hellraiser.

Read More

Time can be a hell of a drug, especially when it comes to the projected image. There’s an inherent danger in revisiting a film we have fond memories of; is it as good as we recall? Conversely, can a film improve after an initial viewing, one that perhaps was initially dismissed with a shrug and a wave of the hand? Case in point: actor David Keith’s directorial debut, The Curse (1987), a film that inspired nothing in me beyond guffaws 30 years ago. But that was then; now it inspires a sense of awe, because if you’ve ever wondered what an American-flavored Lucio Fulci film would look like, clear a spot in your collection for the class clown of the Class of ’87.

Read More

Poor John Carpenter. Like nearly all of the truly great horror filmmakers, his movies are destined to be misunderstood in their time, only finding the proper appreciation several years after the fact when the rest of the world is finally able to catch up to what he’s doing. It’s not always the case, of course, as he has had a handful of commercial hits; for many years, his breakthrough movie Halloween was the most successful independent film ever made. It was the rare instance in which audiences were tuned in to what Carpenter was doing at the time he was doing it. Most of his other great films—and he has more great films than almost any other director working in the genre—took years to connect with the public. Don’t blame Carpenter for that. He’s a man ahead of his time.

Read More

1987 was a wild year for horror and sci-fi cinema.

Read More