Alien Figures
Alien Figures

One of my favorite indie horror movies of the last five years is Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead’s Resolution, a genre-bending effort that’s so confidently unique that it’s become a film I’ve recommended countless times to friends and family, whether they dig horror movies or not, and even programmed it as part of the film fest I used to run out here in Los Angeles, just because I wanted folks to have a chance to see it on a big screen (which doesn’t often happen for a lot of lower-budgeted genre fare).

A few years ago, their Lovecraftian love story Spring knocked my socks off, and I enjoyed their contribution to V/H/S: Viral as well, but nothing could have prepared me for my viewing experience while watching their latest movie, The Endless.

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The era of cinema referred to as Eurohorror is defined by its eroticism, over-the-top violence, and psychedelic supernatural approaches to storytelling. It’s a rabbit hole of movie culture. There are twisting avenues and bizarre subsections that seem endless, but few filmmakers created a library as compulsively watchable and weirdly hypnotizing as Jean Rollin’s. This man’s filmography is massive, a good amount of them representing his work-for-hire hardcore movies and the cheesier selection of horror films. One gets what one might expect: waif-like young women seducing men, seducing each other, and drinking gallons of bright red blood.

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The horrors of sleep paralysis are amplified by composer Marc Vanocur's score in the upcoming horror film Dead Awake. Ahead of the film's May 12th release, we caught up with Vanocur for our latest Q&A feature to discuss making the music for Dead Awake and to reflect on his time working as a sound editor on the Tales from the Crypt TV series.

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You may know him as Winston Zeddmore, Sergeant Albrecht, or even Justin Jones, but right now Ernie Hudson is using his versatile talents in front of the camera to bring the character of Captain Ned Conrad to life on the FOX series APB. To celebrate the season 1 finale of the high-tech yet emotionally grounded police series, I had the great pleasure of speaking with Hudson about his new show, and we also had the chance to talk about his desire to play Winston once again in the world of Ghostbusters, why he doesn't plan on returning to The Crow franchise, and his secretive time on the Twin Peaks revival.

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Psychopaths, the latest film from writer/director Mickey Keating, recently enjoyed its world premiere at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival. Daily Dead had the chance to speak with Keating and Psychopaths co-stars Ashley Bell and Larry Fessenden, and the trio discussed reteaming for their latest collaboration (both Bell and Fessenden were in Keating’s previous genre effort, Carnage Park) and what fans can expect from Keating’s latest slice of horror-fueled fun.

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I was a teenager when ABC’s The Disney Sunday Movie aired Mr. Boogedy (1986), a haunted house tale, and I had no interest in seeing it. I was beyond such childish ventures; my horror was blood and guts and sex and probably more blood. But teenaged Scott didn’t bother to think that every horror fan starts somewhere, and at every age too – and some gateway horror is geared towards nudging the kid to the edge of the pool instead of throwing him in. If you’re looking for some fun horror water wings, Mr. Boogedy will do the trick.

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Post-apocalyptic films were a dime a dozen in the early ‘80s. They were almost always done on the cheap – a small cast of a few survivors, a barren desert and some rags for wardrobe, and voila! Throw it on HBO for a few years and call it a day. But sometimes ambition seeps in, and Night of the Comet (1984) is one of the best examples of low budget ingenuity, smart, sharply drawn characters, and a whole lot of heart. When the aliens return to take back the earth (do you want to claim responsibility for this freak show?) and wish to be shown a film indicative of the ‘80s, show them this – it represents all the best qualities of the decade’s filmmaking.

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It may not be wholly revolutionary in both its approach and the material it explores, but Phoenix Forgotten was a lot more fun than a lot of folks might give it credit for, and it completely took me back to my high school days of being obsessed with The X-Files, science fiction, and the question of whether or not we are truly alone in this universe.

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Arriving in theaters this weekend is Phoenix Forgotten, a docu-style sci-fi film co-written and directed by Justin Barber. The film is centered around the Phoenix Lights phenomenon, a weird occurrence that happened back in 1997 which has yet to be explained over 20 years later. Barber’s project interjects a little fiction into the mix, as Phoenix Forgotten is focused on three missing teens who went out searching for the truth behind the mysterious lights that appeared, only to never be heard from again.

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Before I began writing professionally about horror, I will be the first to admit I was a total stick in the mud. It wasn’t 100% my fault, but I was one of those people who had to have everything planned perfectly, and was always happy to bend over backwards to make sure I was living up to society’s expectations of who I should be, particularly close family members. I was living in this neat little box of a life, and honestly, it was destroying me from the inside, each and every single day.

Then, along came Hot Fuzz, and I realized that life doesn’t have to be so perfect, and that it’s okay to embrace who you are, even if it is a bit unconventional, because regardless of what anyone else thinks, just love what you love and never let anyone tell differently. I was finally ready to be a little less Nicholas Angel and learned to love the Danny Butterman living deep inside of me. And I owe that all to Edgar Wright and Hot Fuzz.

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Out in theaters this weekend is Phoenix Forgotten, the new docu-style film from Justin Barber that explores the possible alien sightings that happened back on March 13th, 1997 in Arizona, that still have yet to be answered to this day. Co-written by T.S. Nowlin and Barber, Phoenix Forgotten follows three tenacious teenagers who set out to find the truth of the Phoenix Lights phenomenon one fateful night, only to disappear without a trace, leaving their friends, family, and authorities perplexed about what happened to them after they ventured into the desert in search of the truth.

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As a man with multiple personalities (23, to be exact), James McAvoy is enthralling to watch in in M. Night Shyamalan's Split, but just as intriguing is his psychiatrist, Dr. Karen Fletcher, played by the great Betty Buckley, who plays a nail-biting mental chess match with her multi-dimensional patient in some of the film's most fascinating scenes.

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Six strangers wake up in the same room and are forced to take part in an experiment where only one will survive. They have two hours to make their decision as a group in The Eyes, a new suspense thriller from director Robbie Bryan. With The Eyes now playing in select theaters, we had a chance to catch up with Bryan for our latest Q&A feature to discuss the movie's incredible journey to getting made, the "visual ballet" of the movie's most challenging scene, and much more.

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In a decade overrun with sequels, Kevin Tenney’s Night of the Demons stood out above the competition with its perfect mixture of shock and schlock. A staple for Halloween parties and sleepovers, this darkly comedic, satanic-tinged slasher rattled the eyes with its gory corn syrupy kills and startled the ears with its Carpenter-esque score supplied by Dennis Michael Tenney.

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My favorite thing about taking these weekly trips to the Drive-In is my own selfish thirst for discovery. I need to patch up the holes of missing films on my personal movie screen; there is still so much to see, and sometimes the holes are so big that they obscure the view. Every once in a while though, a film comes along that not only mends the tears in the fabric but strengthens the whole. Such is the case with Night of the Demon (1957), Jacques Tourneur’s masterpiece of shadowy menace and dread, and a new personal favorite.

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Alien Figures