Mobile
Banner

For a little over one month of her life, Mary Rose was missing. As haunting as her disappearance on a secluded Scottish island was, her sudden reappearance was even more unsettling. The subject of J.M. Barrie's ghost story and nearly the centerpiece of an Alfred Hitchcock film, this eerie fictional event is further explored in Geoffrey Girard’s new horror novel Mary Rose, and ahead of the book's October 17th release at Barnes & Noble (courtesy of Adaptive Books), we've been provided with the exclusive trailer for the novel to share with Daily Dead readers.

You can watch the trailer for Mary Rose below, and we also have additional details on the new horror novel. To learn more about the book, visit Geoffrey Girard’s official website.

"Mary Rose Moreland and Simon Blake are the perfect couple: successful young professionals in Philadelphia, attractive, madly in love, and ready to start a life together. When they travel to England for Simon to ask her parents’ permission to marry Mary Rose, he learns an unsettling secret: Mary Rose disappeared when she was a little girl while the family was vacationing on a remote Scottish island. She reappeared mysteriously thirty-three days later in the exact same spot without a scratch on her and no memory of what had happened.

After Simon hears about this disturbing episode in Mary Rose’s childhood, he becomes obsessed with finding out what happened. He proceeds to launch his own investigation and arranges during their honeymoon for them to visit the island where she disappeared. But as Mary Rose’s behavior gets stranger after their engagement, the need for Simon to unlock the truth about her past grows even more urgent. What he uncovers is beyond his most terrifying fears.

Mary Rose is author Geoffrey Girard’s chilling and modern take on a classic ghost story originally written by J. M. Barrie. And for years, master of suspense Alfred Hitchcock attempted to adapt Mary Rose into a film but was never successful. With this novel, Girard taps into the nightmarish fears that inspired both Barrie and Hitchcock, while also bringing the story to the present day with his own unique voice."

Mobile
Mobile
Banner