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It may be a bit rough around the edges, but there’s a lot to enjoy about director Chad Archibald’s Bite. In a day and age when most genre fans feel like they’ve seen just about everything, his take on body horror is boldly refreshing and offers up a few unexpected twists that I genuinely appreciated. Bite also boasts some of the most impressive production design and practical special effects I’ve seen on the indie level in some time, and it is anchored by an effectively unnerving performance by up-and-coming actress Elma Begovic.

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Throughout his career, filmmaker Ben Wheatley has always taken chances as a storyteller, and his latest movie, High-Rise, may be his boldest and most ambitious work to date.

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One of the darkest of dark comedies to be released by a major studio in the early ’90s, Death Becomes Her is something of a minor miracle. It casts three A-list actors in a special effects comedy about nasty people doing nasty things to one another. It wreaks havoc on the human body to score macabre laughs. Hollywood comedies are rarely this weird.

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Heading off to summer camp can be a scary experience, especially when you accidentally go to one built for monsters. Teen camper Skye takes a fun approach to a frightening situation in Camp Midnight, the new graphic novel from Man of Action’s Steven T. Seagle and artist Jason Adam Katzenstein. With the fun-for-all-ages Camp Midnight hitting shelves today from Image Comics, we caught up with the Seagle and Katzenstein to discuss the relatable elements of their supernatural story, real-life summer camp inspirations, and much more.

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A&E’s Bates Motel Season 4 has featured a lot of hope for its often tormented characters thus far, but there have been moments of unsettling horror, and if the latest episode—expertly directed by Nestor Carbonell (who plays Sheriff Romero)—is any indication, there will be many more conflicts to come. Daily Dead recently had the opportunity to participate in a conference call with Carbonell and executive producer Carlton Cuse to discuss the relationships in season four, the show’s five-year plan, how much fans can expect the end of the series to match what exists in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, and much more.

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It may have been his recent thriller Blue Ruin that put writer/director Jeremy Saulnier on the proverbial map, but Green Room firmly establishes the filmmaker as a cinematic force to be reckoned with, as he confidently creates a tension-filled masterpiece brimming with hellish intentions and pulsating with a palpable sense of raw ferocity from start to finish. Simply put, Green Room is punk as f—k and features a blistering performance from Patrick Stewart.

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From the mid sixties to the mid seventies, omnibus (or anthology, or portmanteau if you’re really fancy) horror films were big business. And Amicus Productions ruled the roost. Between ’65 and ’74 they released seven such films, starting with Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors (not to be confused with Dr. Tongue’s Evil House of Pancakes) and culminating with From Beyond the Grave. Today’s film lands in the middle, The House that Dripped Blood (1971) showcasing a company just starting to hit their stride with anthologies.

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As heartfelt as it is unsettling, the “Father’s Day” segment of the horror anthology Holidays is not only my favorite short of the film, it’s also one of the most enthralling things I’ve seen this year. For most of its runtime, the segment solely stars Jocelin Donahue as Carol, a woman listening to the instructions of her supposedly dead father (voiced by Michael Gross) on a tape player, leading her to a final destination of either hope or horror.

With Holidays now out in theaters and on VOD courtesy of Vertical Entertainment and XYZ Films, I had a chance to speak with Donahue, who discussed her powerful performance in “Father’s Day” as well as her improvised scene with Christian Bale and Antonio Banderas in Terrence Malick’s Knight of Cups.

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Stuart Gordon’s debut feature, Re-Animator, isn’t just one of the best horror movies of the 1980s, but also one of the few rare perfect horror comedies ever made. Alongside Evil Dead 2, the original Re-Animator essentially helped invent the splatstick subgenre and announced Gordon as one of the most exciting voices in horror, plus, it turned genre royalty Jeffrey Combs and Barbara Crampton into stars overnight. There’s almost no way it could be outdone in its sequel, 1990’s Bride of Re-Animator, though it’s not for lack of trying.

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Recognizing that it’s more than likely an unpopular opinion, I need to come clean and confess that I prefer Tobe Hooper’s 1986 sequel, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Part 2, to its predecessor, which I’m also quick to point out is an unparalleled masterpiece of the genre. This has everything to do with personal taste. Tobe Hooper is one of my favorite filmmakers of all-time, and while I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve seen his 1974 classic, I probably revisit Part 2 every year. It’s one of my very favorite horror movies.

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