Leatherface
Jason Voorhees

M. Night Shyamalan is on a career upswing, and Split is somewhat of a return to an earlier form for the director of the standout fright film The Sixth Sense and the superhero-influenced Unbreakable. Mr. Shyamalan was, and still is, unfortunately typecast as a director known for surprising, shocking twist endings. This makes watching his films somewhat of a difficult and frustrating ordeal because of the need to overanalyze every aspect. Still, minus a few films, Shyamalan has crafted a career that indulges in the art of the mystery, and with Split, the writer/director proves that he can still build an effectively suspenseful film that keeps you wondering what’s going to happen next.

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Michael Caine had an interesting run of genre flicks starting in the late ‘70s. The Swarm (1978) was laughed off the screen, Dressed to Kill (1980) was enjoyed by audiences and critics alike, and The Hand (1981) dropped his batting average once again. Nestled in between all those was The Island (1980), a killer pirate movie from the author of Jaws and directed by the man behind The Bad News Bears. What could go wrong? Well, everything, according to most folk. It’s an odd one to be sure, but the wild tonal shifts that prevent the ship from staying on a clear course make it a fascinating treasure that gets better with each viewing.

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Writer/director Damien Power’s Killing Ground may tread some seemingly familiar territory in terms of its overall approach to survival horror—a young couple dealing with deadly backcountry predators on their idyllic getaway is certainly something fans have seen before. But make no mistake, what seems like a pretty standard set-up in Killing Ground evolves viciously into an unexpected game of cat and mouse, and Powers does a brilliant job of both embracing and deconstructing the genre tropes at play in his horrifically savage thriller.

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Has watching Tim Burton’s Beetlejuice ever made you want to summon a wisecracking ghost in your own home? While you may not have the proper tools to contact the supernatural, Sideshow Collectibles has the next best thing with their incredibly detailed, eerily lifelike sixth scale figure of Betelgeuse. With the new figure being released this month, they’ve given us a special look at the collectible that’s sure to please longtime fans of the iconic Michael Keaton character.

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Authors and filmmakers have explored alien invasions since the birth of science fiction. The most common incarnation of this story features the aliens seeking domination over the Earth, with the humans uniting and fighting back. At their cores, these tales are optimistic, and their power pales in comparison to the horrifying allegory at the heart of Octavia Butler’s Dawn. [For those who have not read this and want to, be warned—this article contains a few spoilers.]

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[Welcome back, readers! With the 2017 Sundance Film Festival beginning this week, we thought it would be fun to take a look back at some of the great midnight movies that have come out of the fest over the years. Click here for more Midnight Memories from Daily Dead!]

It’s unfortunate that when many fans hear the names “Lucky McKee” and “Sundance” mentioned in the same sentence, the first thing that comes to mind is an incident in which an audience member had a total public meltdown after the festival screened McKee’s fourth feature (fifth if you count Red, which he co-directed), The Woman, in 2011.

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[Welcome back, readers! With the 2017 Sundance Film Festival beginning this week, we thought it would be fun to take a look back at some of the great midnight movies that have come out of the fest over the years. Be sure to check back here each day this week for more Midnight Memories from Daily Dead!]

Last January marked ten years since Neil Marshall’s The Descent was screened at the Sundance Film Festival. Over a decade after it was featured in the Park City at Midnight lineup, The Descent is almost universally considered a modern horror classic, which is unfortunate for yours truly because until recently, I’d never actually seen it. But after finally venturing into this cave, I am happy to say that this is one of those rare movies that completely lives up to the hype.

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[Welcome back, readers! With the 2017 Sundance Film Festival beginning this week, we thought it would be fun to take a look back at some of the great midnight movies that have come out of the fest over the years. Be sure to check back here each day this week for more Midnight Memories from Daily Dead!]

After George A. Romero brought Bub to the big screen in 1985’s Day of the Dead, audiences would go on to wait nearly 30 years before his next zombie film, Land of the Dead, shambled into cinemas. Thankfully, the Godfather of the Dead only took a quick breather before returning with his fifth—and arguably most ambitious—zombie movie, Diary of the Dead, which screened at the Sundance Film Festival on January 18th, 2008 (following its 2007 screening at TIFF).

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Robert Englund and Freddy Krueger. Not since Bela Lugosi and Dracula have a character and an actor been so deeply linked.

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Later this year, Joel Schumacher’s landmark horror comedy The Lost Boys celebrates its 30th anniversary, and to celebrate the milestone, author and filmmaker Paul Davis is embarking on his newest project, Lost in the Shadows: The Story of The Lost Boys, which is a book that chronicles every aspect that went into bringing the vampires of Santa Cruz, and those who fought against them, to life.

Over the weekend, Davis (whose recent print retrospective for An American Werewolf in London sold out in record time) hosted a 30th anniversary panel at IMATS (International Make-Up Artist Trade Show) 2017 Los Angeles to celebrate the brilliant special effects of The Lost Boys, and he brought a few friends along with him, including co-stars Alex Winter, Jamison Newlander, and Billy Wirth, as well as legendary makeup artists Ve Neill, Greg Cannom, and Steve LaPorte.

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